Modern Missions

EnglishItalianoFrançaisDeutschEspañolPortuguêsMagyarPolskiРусскийالعربية

Modern Missions of the Templar Order:

Continuing the Authentic Templar Missions in the Modern Era

Discover the authentic historical missions of the Order, all restored, adapted and applied in the modern era as the real Templar way of life of Chivalry, as Guardians of Justice and Champions of the Oppressed.

 

 

Authentic to its true history, the restored Templar Order continues the original missions of its founding ancestors, as Defenders of All Faith, Guardians of Justice, Champions of the Oppressed, and Keepers of the Sacred Knowledge as the shared heritage of humanity, restoring and upholding the pillars of civilization, to once again lead the world into a new Renaissance period.

Guardian Angel 'Heilige Schutzengel' published by Lindberg
Guardian Angel ‘Heilige Schutzengel’, painting by Hans Zabateri (Hans Zatzka), Austria (ca. 1918 AD), published by Lindberg Heilige Schutzengel

During the 700 years of abeyance of the Grand Mastery of the Order, surviving as an underground network until the Templar Restoration (2007-2016), its genuine missions became obscured by popularized misconceptions from private fraternities and the modern entertainment industry.  The authentic historical missions of the Order have been revived by diligent restoration of the ancient Code of Chivalry of 1066 AD, the founding Temple Rule of 1129 AD, and the medieval Templar Code of 1150 AD, as the real Templar way of life.

As a result, the true missions have been redefined and reasserted in the modern era, from the words of the founding Knights Templar themselves.

Although the Knights Templar came to be known as the “Army of God” when enforcing the Magna Carta of civil rights over Kings [1], the modern Templar Order is not an “army” by military force, but rather is a metaphorical “army of skilled professionals” leading humanitarian missions.

 

 

 

 

Missions Far Beyond “Protection of Pilgrims”

 

Mainstream modern history books on the Knights Templar have popularized a superficial narrative of the missions of the Order, supposedly mostly limited to “protecting pilgrims” travelling to Holy sites. However, the true role of the Templar Order as Defenders and Guardians is much greater, and the authentic scope of its historical missions is much wider, as upholding the pillars of civilization for the benefit of humanity.

‘Knight of the Temple’ by Fredrik Alfredsson (2004)

The historical record proves that “protecting pilgrims” was mostly symbolic, as a preliminary and sideline activity, which most medieval Templars actually never engaged in:

The service of protecting pilgrims was mostly the means to obtain from King Baldwin II access to the Temple of Solomon, and Royal Patronage to establish the Templar Order. Historians emphasize that “The offer was irresistible to the King and the Patriarch” of Jerusalem [2]. The medieval chronicler Michael the Syrian reported that the Templars had planned to be mostly monastic, but King Baldwin “persuaded” them to “police his kingdom”, and provided them with living quarters and financial income during their excavation of the Temple of Solomon. [3]

The Temple Rule, in a later amendment (ca. 1150 AD) evidences that a small force of only 10 Templars were actually assigned to protecting pilgrims: “The Commander of the City of Jerusalem should have ten knight brothers under his command to lead and guard the pilgrims who come” (Rule 121) [4].

The Vatican recognized a much greater role of the Order, as non-military Defenders upholding civilization through professional skills:

Their original aim was to protect pilgrims… as they traveled… to visit Holy Places… However, the religious [professional] vocation maintained its superior status over the call to arms. Saint Bernard states that it is permissible for these Milites Christi tostrike with the sword… provided that they have not embraced a higher calling’”. [5] [6]

Scholars note that the Papal Bull Omne Datum Optimum of 1139 AD established “formal recognition of the Order’s much wider role as Defenders of Christendom than the restricted [limited] function which [it] originally undertook”, although “they did not cease to act as the protectors of pilgrims” [7].

Under the Code of Chivalry of 1066 AD, for its mandate “Thou shalt defend the Church”, the 11th century Pontifical knighting ceremony commanded: “Go, and remember that the Saints did not conquer kingdoms by the sword but by Faith.” (Commandment II) [8]

This confirms that for the primary Templar role as Defenders of the Faith, even the Church itself defined this not as military fighting, but rather to oppose evil by representing the principle of Faith in God in international affairs.

Historians confirm that the primary role of the Templars, as non-military Defenders and Guardians, was actually exercising Diplomatic status of the Order for strategic geopolitics: “Their sphere of operation expanded during the next century… they became high level diplomats serving kings and nobles” [9].

Vatican records witnessed that the Templar Order exercised its own inherent statehood as a non-territorial Principality, “possessing power equal to that of the leading temporal sovereigns” [10], with full Diplomatic status including “the right of concluding treaties” [11].

These facts prove that the temporary mission of “protecting pilgrims” was actually a part-time “day job” for the Knights Templar, as the service most in demand to attract the support of Kings and Church, to earn income for the Order to conduct its real underlying missions of recovering the Ancient Priesthood of Solomon and restoring the pillars of civilization.

Indeed, there are many ways to provide security, far beyond the limited aspect of physical security. As one notable example, the Templars invented branch banking, such that pilgrims and travelers were “able to deposit money at a Templar monastery bank in a European city, then redeem these medieval travelers’ checks upon arrival in the Holy Land” [12].

There are many other modern types of strategic security, including Legal Security, Economic Security, Operational Security (“Op-Sec”) and Information Security (“Info-Sec”), which the Templar Order may provide to governments and the private sector. Many lawyers, security professionals, national security and military veterans join the Templar Order and support such projects.

 

Military Function Replaced by Geopolitical Chessboard

 

The medieval Knights Templar only provided a military function by invitation and authorization of the King of a host country or Prince of a principality. In the modern era, the use of organized armed force remains the exclusive lawful domain of territorial states. The independent deployment of any armed military or law enforcement service by an Order of Chivalry would seriously violate international law, by violating the sovereignty of any host country. Raising any armed force in that way could only be at best “mercenaries”, and at worst “terrorists”.

Satirical Map (ca. 1913) Illustrating Geopolitics

For that compelling reason, the Templar Ministry of Security Act of 2014 mandates that: “The Order shall not raise any standing armies, nor maintain a body of armed personnel for the purpose of any tactical operations nor engagement in any conventional warfare.” (Article 3.1) However, the Act establishes other functions of support and cooperation with national military and law enforcement agencies, which justify the Order having a Ministry of Security with uniformed ranking officers (Article 3.5).

Continuing its primary original function of exercising Diplomatic status for geopolitical missions, the modern Templar Order has been fully and legally restored as a non-territorial Principality and “sovereign subject of international law” with statehood [13] [14], thereby inherently possessing full Diplomatic status for official international relations [15] [16].

Conducting official Diplomatic relations does not mean merely being “diplomatic”, in the superficial sense of supposed politeness and compromise. The widespread understanding of this reality is confirmed by the anonymous gem of folk wisdom, which became popularized as the satirical definition of a Diplomat: “A diplomat is a person who can tell you to go to hell, in such a way, that you actually look forward to the trip.” [17]

The term “Diplomacy”, first used in 1796 AD, is defined as “managing international relations” through “representatives abroad” [18]. Thus, real Diplomatic work means actively representing, asserting and defending the rights and interests of a State in international affairs. Authentically, the primary interests of the State should be to protect the rights of its people, especially universal human rights, and constitutional civil rights.

The exercise of Diplomatic status is actually the active practice of Geopolitics. The term “Geopolitics”, first used in 1904, is defined as the strategic combination of politics with geography, as applied to the foreign policy of States affecting international relations in world affairs [19]. Thus, Diplomacy necessarily involves dealing with military strategies and military alliances affecting the balance of powers among States, in defense of lawful rights and humanitarian interests.

Accordingly, the Templar Order has not abdicated its role in military defense projects for upholding the Rule of Law and human rights in world affairs. Indeed, by conducting Diplomatic relations, the Order can assert a significant role in influencing military strategies and resulting world events, through alliances with other States and inter-governmental organizations (IGO’s).

The principles and missions of the Templar Order are very publicly declared and transparently proven.  However, current details of its Diplomatic relations and alliances with other States and IGO institutions are generally classified under the Templar State Secrets Act of 2011 (Article 2), and typically also classified by the cooperating governments. (This is only temporary confidentiality for operational security, and the Order may reveal its accomplishments at a later time, after certain strategic events are completed.)

Apart from conventional warfare, there are many other types of modern warfare, especially Information Warfare (“Info-War”) of fighting by Truth, and Legal Warfare (“Law-fare”) of fighting by international law, which the Templar Order may provide to governments and the private sector. These are mostly applied to the larger sphere of geopolitical International Security, through diplomatic alliances. Many scholars, lawyers, career diplomats, national security and military veterans join the Templar Order and support such projects.

 

Authentic Missions of the Modern Templar Order

 

The Temple Rule of 1129 AD requires that “in this Order… no Brother [or Sister] shall fight nor rest… but according to the commands of the [Order]” (Rule 41) [20]. Thus, when there are no specific ‘action orders’ from the Grand Mastery, the commandments of the Temple Rule itself establish the core Templar missions as permanent ‘standing orders’ from the founding ancestors.

 

Modesty as a Templar Strategy

The historical Templar motto is “Non nobis Domine, sed nomini Tuo da gloriam”, meaning “Not to us, Lord, but to Thy name give the glory” (Psalm 115:1) [21].

This is not only a spiritual doctrine of modesty and humility, but also a practical Templar strategy for successful missions: Templars do not conduct missions to be seen, in the modern promotional style of “Hey, look at us, we are doing this great thing!” Rather, Templars do missions for results, and to uplift others and empower humanity, by manifesting the glory of God.

This principle was taught by Jesus in his Sermon on the Mount: “Do not your alms [charity] before men, to be seen of them: otherwise ye have no reward of your Father [God] which is in heaven. Therefore when thou doest thine alms [charity], do not sound a trumpet before thee… [to] have glory of men. … But… that thine alms may be in secret: and thy Father which seeth in secret himself shall reward thee openly.” (Matthew 6:1-4) [22]

This was also taught by the Apostles, who best summarized: “Charity vaunteth [boasts] not itself, is not puffed up.” (I Corinthians 13:4)

Accordingly, while the motivating purposes and intended results of Templar missions are transparently declared publicly, Templars work quietly, and particular missions are usually not announced, except to the extent necessary to call attention to a humanitarian cause. This also ensures a degree of reasonable confidentiality, for operational security against a counter-culture of evil-doers who typically seek to undermine and sabotage humanitarian projects.

 

Core Missions of the Templar Order

The following are summaries of the essential and continual historical missions of the Templar Order, which serve as the permanent “standing orders” guiding all general activities and special projects. These missions are implemented through the non-profit inter-governmental organization (IGO) the “Order of the Temple of Solomon Foundation”, and through external cooperating non-profit IGO institutions supported by the Templar Order.

 

Diplomatic Support and International Relations

 

“Ritorno Degli Ambasciatori” (“Return of the English Ambassadors”) by Vittore Carpaccio (ca. 1495 AD), Detail
“Ritorno Degli Ambasciatori” (“Return of the English Ambassadors”) by Vittore Carpaccio (ca. 1495 AD), Detail

The Temple Rule dedicates the Order “to serve in chivalry with the sovereign King”, as an alliance together “with” (not “under”) a kingdom, meaning the Order can serve multiple kingdoms (Rule 1). It confirms that Templars are “servants of the sovereign King”, which also applies to supporting the national governments of modern countries (Rule 9) [23].

Therefore, the modern Order provides strategic diplomatic support to a Royal Alliance of surviving historical kingdoms, which provide Royal Protection to the Templar Order. Templar Crown Officers thus serve as official Diplomats, Special Envoys, and Advisors to Kings and Queens, which requires appropriate professional qualifications. The Order may also provide such support to presidential administrations of countries, either directly or through cooperating inter-governmental organization (IGO) institutions.

Templars were traditionally “sent through diverse parts of the world”, and are instructed to live by Templar principles and values to have “good reports from outsiders”, and to “set an example of good works and wisdom” (Rule 37). [24]

Accordingly, even for those not qualified to be official Diplomats, all Templar Brothers and Sisters serve as “Goodwill Ambassadors”, engaged in cultural diplomacy among the peoples of nations of the world.

 

Justice by Support for the Independent Judiciary

 

“Court of Common Pleas” (ca. 1460 AD) illuminated manuscript, in Inner Temple Library, London
“Court of Common Pleas” (ca. 1460 AD) illuminated manuscript, in Inner Temple Library, London

The Temple Rule dedicates the Order to “the love of Justice which constitutes its duties” (Rule 2), including enforcement as all wrongdoing must be punished “for the love of Justice” to protect the innocent (Rule 47), and to uphold and enforce rights “Justly… [and] only as specifically established” by law (Rule 57). It further commands “for the love of Truth… to Judge the matter” by serving as Judges over disputes whenever requested (Rule 59) [25].

The Knights Templar were the Law Givers of the Magna Carta of 1215 AD, the first human rights and civil rights charter which developed the Common Law system. The charter was written by the Templar dynastic House of Anjou [26], promoted by the “Baron’s War” of Templar nobility [27], signed in the Templar headquarters of Temple Church in London [28], and further enforced over Kings by the Templars [29] [30] [31] [32] [33].

The Templar Order established the traditional world center of the Independent Legal Profession at Chancery Lane in London ca. 1185 AD [34] [35], which took over the legal profession as the exclusive legal education center for the Common Law system in 1234 AD, developing the famous Inns of Court [36].

The modern Order provides strategic infrastructure support to the Independent Judiciary Profession, for restoring the Independent Legal Profession internationally. Many Templars thus work with Judges and Barristers at the highest level of the legal profession, which requires appropriate professional qualifications in law. The Order may provide such support either directly or through cooperating inter-governmental organization (IGO) institutions and Courts of Justice.

Even for those not qualified as lawyers, Templars with other relevant skills can serve in various roles, assisting Continuing Legal Education (CLE) programs for Barristers, and supporting the enforcement capabilities of international Justice Courts, as Administrators, Experts, or even Court Officers for investigations or enforcement.

 

Humanitarian Relief and Strategic Intervention

 

“Portrait of Sir Francis Ford's Children Giving Coin to Beggar” (ca. 1793 AD) by Sir William Beechey
“Portrait of Sir Francis Ford’s Children Giving Coin to Beggar” (ca. 1793 AD) by Sir William Beechey

The Temple Rule dedicates the Order “to defend the poor” (Rule 2), and instructs to give old clothes to the poor (Rule 19), and to distribute excess food to the poor (Rule 29). The Order “must sustain the weaknesses… of others” (Rule 47), and “mandate[s] that if anyone… requests anything of you, for the weak… we command you” to provide assistance and problem solving, “perpetually in all matters which will be bound to you.” (Rule 59). [37]

This essential mission of humanitarian intervention was taught by Jesus: “The King [God] shall answer… Inasmuch as ye have done unto one of the least of these… ye have done unto me.” (Matthew 25:34-45) [38]

Arguably none are more poor, or more in need, than genuine Refugees forced to flee wars, genocide and major disasters, separated from their homes, disconnected from their resources, and deprived of community support.

However, dominant globalist countries, and most non-profit “charities” following their propaganda, only help mere economic migrants seeking a “better life” (making them political pawns controlled by government benefits, while impoverishing receiving countries), while genuine Refugees are almost completely ignored. Usually, Refugees only receive occasional temporary “aid”, such as handouts of tents, food and water, while the war rages on.

As best said by the American novelist Christie Craig as “C.C. Hunter” (ca. 2007): “That’s not going to fix anything. It’s like putting a band-aid on a bullet wound.” There is no point in giving people superficial “aid” today, if globalist armies and their state-sponsored terrorists are just going to bomb them again tomorrow. The only real solution is to enforce Human Rights Law against the violating countries, to stop the causes of suffering.

The power of Human Rights Law is much greater than mainstream media propaganda leads us to believe. Beyond the more obvious cases such as war crimes, Human Rights also include civil rights, constitutional rights, and even economic rights. Arguably, all charitable causes and humanitarian needs are ultimately symptoms of underlying Human Rights violations.

Fortunately, there always seem to be many private non-profit charities capable of rapid response providing superficial temporary humanitarian “aid”. However, the Templar Order has the unique capabilities and official status – and thus a special responsibility – to enforce Human Rights Law at the inter-governmental level, to stop the real causes of suffering.

The modern Order provides true Humanitarian Relief and Strategic Intervention for genuine Refugees (and other causes), by leveraging international law to change the geopolitical balance of powers to restore Human Rights. This mission requires Diplomatic muscle, backed by Judiciary power, such that it is really a combination of the first two primary Templar missions of Diplomatic Support and Judiciary Support.

 

Defense of the Church as Guardians of All Faith

 

“Kingdom of Heaven” by Sergei 'SS Wanderer' Russia (2015)
“Kingdom of Heaven” by Sergei ‘SS Wanderer’ Russia (2015)

The Temple Rule declares that “God has chosen” the Templar Order for “defense of the Holy Church” (Rule 1), “to defend… churches” (Rule 2), as “divine service” of God (Rule 9). It commands to always uphold “the purposes of religion”, meaning the shared values underlying all religions, inspiring others through “setting an example” (Rule 37). [39]

The essence of “Faith” is much more than mere “belief” in any particular religion. Faith itself is truly the emotional and intellectual awareness of the underlying life force and mechanics of the universe.  While these forces are mostly not tangibly detectable by us, they are still perceivable through our experiences.  In the Code of Canon Law study of these energy forces is called the “sacred sciences” (Canons 218, 229, 248, 279, 815).

The key element of Faith is a conscious appreciation for a higher purpose and greater source of cause and effect, which is beyond the limitations of human planning. Only Faith helps us experience the fullness of life and relationships, and carries us through hardships by a guiding sense of spiritual purpose.

By restoring Faith internationally, we can thereby restore the collective human heritage of kindness, goodness, wisdom and knowledge, bringing essential humanitarian values back into their rightful place in modern civilization.

The modern Order continues this historical mission of serving as Defenders of the Church and Guardians of All Faith. Much of this work relies on the first two primary Templar missions of Diplomatic Support and Judiciary Support, for restoring and protecting ecclesiastical sovereignty and religious rights and freedoms under international law.

Many projects of the Order are for restoring and promoting Faith itself, including by reconciliation of science and religion, archaeology and theology, and more. This work is mostly a combination of the other two Templar missions of Academic Research and Historical Preservation.

 

Animal Rights and Care as a Spiritual Duty to God

 

“The Faithful Servant” (ca. 1880 AD) by John Sargeant Noble
“The Faithful Servant” (ca. 1880 AD) by John Sargeant Noble

The Temple Rule requires diligent care and respect for service animals including proper and sanitary feeding (Rule 54), and commands to “zealously take care of… horses”, and not to run one “if it is not rested” (Rule 315). It mandates human concern for the comfort and well-being of animals, as “two Templars should not ride upon one horse” (Rule 379). It mostly prohibits hunting for kindness to animals (Rule 55), allowing “wild animals” to be “taken” for food only by humane and peaceful means (Rule 151). [40]

In the Ancient Priesthood of Solomon, as recovered and preserved by the founding Knights Templar, “animals [were] part of… the divine nature”, and “the animal itself [was] thought of as conveying the divinity [of God]” [41].

King Solomon himself said: “He [God] has made every [animal] beautiful… He has put eternity in their hearts. … Surely… man has no advantage over animals, for all is vanity.” (Ecclesiastes 3:11, 3:19-20) [42]. Solomon also wrote: “You save humans and animals alike, O Lord” (Psalm 36:6), and Jesus confirmed that “all flesh [creatures] shall see the salvation of God” (Luke 3:6) [43].

The Bible teaches a compelling story of how animals are closer to God and can see the Angels: A man was riding a donkey, which turned and stopped three times, each time struck by the man forcing her to continue forward. Then God “opened the mouth” of the animal who spoke to rebuke him, and “opened the eyes” of the man, who then “saw the Angel of the Lord standing in the way, and his sword drawn in his hand.” The Angel declared that the donkey had saved his life, because “unless she had turned from me, surely… I had slain thee, and saved her alive.” (Numbers 22:23-33) [44]

The modern Order continues this sacred mission of Animal Rights and kindness to animals, as an essential part of chivalric service to God. Many Templars thus promote and support animal rescue, animal shelters, and various programs for animal care and placement in loving homes.

 

Academic Research Advancing Truth and Education

 

“Abelard and his Pupil Heloise” (1882 AD) Edmund Blair Leighton (Detail)
“Abelard and his Pupil Heloise” (1882 AD) Edmund Blair Leighton (Detail)

The Temple Rule presents “studious purification” by learning as one of the essential Templar missions (Rule 1), and describes Templars as “lovers of Truth” advancing scholarship “by refined and studious hearts” (Rule 6). It specifically commands all Templars “during periods of time, [to] study universally” by scholarly studies (Rule 9), and “to apply all one’s study and understanding” (Rule 279). [45]

By those principles, despite the prevailing illiteracy of the Middle Ages, the historical Order of the Temple of Solomon was also dedicated to serving as a major center of education, providing many functions of a “university”, promoting scholarly studies by advancing academic research. Indeed, the Papal Bull Omne Datum Optimum of 1139 AD specifically recognized the Templar Order as a “university institution” (Latin: ‘uniersitetem exortamur’) [46].

The 1st Grand Master Hughes de Payens once said to the Templar Patron Saint Bernard de Clairvaux: “If you are not permitted to wield the lance [weapon], at least direct your pen against the tyrannical foe, as this moral support is of no small help” [47].

The modern Order continues this essential mission of Academic Research, recovering and preserving Truth, for restoration and reconstruction of diverse areas of “lost history” and “lost knowledge”, as keys to reestablishing the pillars of civilization. This work is applied to develop university textbooks supporting Education for the general public, returning many “secrets” to the people as the collective heritage of humanity.

All research is required to be of institutional scholarly quality and solid academic caliber, with much emphasis on source references of evidence disproving propaganda and proving Truth of factual knowledge. Qualified textbooks will be published by cooperating university institutions, with open public distribution.

 

Historical Preservation of Sacred World Heritage

 

Saint Theodosius and Saint Anthony with a sacred book, unknown artist
Saint Theodosius and Saint Anthony with a sacred book, unknown artist

The Temple Rule mandates that the ancient sacred knowledge and wisdom, and historical knowledge of the pillars of civilization, must be preserved by the Order as an institution: Such history of world heritage must be “guarded purely and durably” (Rule 2), “must not be forgotten, and… must be guarded firmly” (Rule 8) [48].

The Templar Patron Saint Bernard de Clairvaux, in his speech In Praise of the New Knighthood (ca. 1136 AD), emphasized the importance of restoring and preserving cultural heritage, as an essential part of God’s plan for humanity:

Once [the evildoers] have been cast out, he shall return to his heritage and to his house, which aroused his [righteous] anger… ‘I have left my house, I have forsaken my heritage,’ and he will fulfill that other prophecy:  ‘The Lord has ransomed his people and delivered them.  They shall come… and rejoice in the good things of the Lord.”  (Chapter 3) [49]

The 12th century chronicler Geoffrey de Vinsauf, attributed with documenting many details of Templar history, explained the profound importance of historical preservation, especially through academic writings and fine arts:

It sometimes happens, that exploits, however well known and splendidly achieved, come, by length of time, to be less known to fame, or even forgotten among posterity. In this manner the renown of many kings has faded… much celebrated in their own times, when… unanimous applause set them up as models before the people.

The ancient Greeks, aware of this, were wise enough to use the pen as a remedy against oblivion, and zealously stimulated their writers, whom they termed historiographers, to compile histories of noble deeds. Thus the silence of the living voice was supplied by the voice of writing, so that the virtues of men might not die with them.

The Romans, emulating the Greeks, with the view of perpetuating merit, not only employed the service of the pen, but also added sculpture: and thus by exhibiting the ancients they excited their descendants, and impressed the love of virtue the more strongly on the minds of its imitators”. [50]

The modern Order continues this essential mission of Historical Preservation. Recovering and restoring areas of “lost history” is not about studying things from the past for mere interest – It is about preserving and applying the time-tested solutions to the problems of the modern world in the present.

Templar Legacy Heritage Library – The real essence of the legendary “Treasure of the Templars” is actually historical documents from the Library of the Ancient Priesthood, which the founding Knights discovered “during their excavations of the Temple” of Solomon [51]. The true “Treasure” was in fact “centuries-old knowledge” of ancient sacred wisdom, from the most prosperous civilization-building times in human history [52].

Carrying this Templar tradition forward, the modern Order continually develops the “Templar Legacy Heritage Library”, as a Digital Library, in partnership with cooperating universities. This work involves collecting rare, out-of-print, and often antique books, selected as the best of historical, spiritual, and religious resources available. Together with its newly restored or translated historical works, these are organized into digitized text-searchable editions for use in research and education.

Archaeology Site Surveys & Analysis – The Templar Order itself was originally founded as a mission of the Cistercian Order, specifically to recover ancient scriptures “buried beneath” the Temple of Solomon, which were already considered to be “hidden treasure” [53]. The Order was established by the resulting “covert project beneath the Temple of Solomon” [54] [55], where the founding Knights Templar conducted archaeological excavation of the site for a full nine years [56].

Since Napoleon’s expedition to Egypt in 1798 AD, over 200 years of archaeology has already discovered a multitude of revealing sites and artifacts, extensively documented in scientific journals and well preserved in national museums. However, the vast majority of discoveries could not be properly processed and analyzed collectively in context.

Therefore, modern archaeology is really not about making new “discoveries” of sites and artifacts by excavations. Rather, what is of great necessity is actually “Site Surveys”, revisiting already public sites, and “next level” scholarly research and analysis (taking past research to new levels), in the context of other sites and museum artifacts.

Continuing this Templar tradition, the modern Order conducts Archaeology missions of site surveys and analysis, for a comprehensive reconstruction of the Ancient Priesthood of Solomon and the Truth of the pillars of civilization. This continues to unveil many new “discoveries” of practical knowledge, which strengthen the foundations and depth of substance of the Templar Order and many restored historical institutions which it supports.

 

Non-Profit Fundraising for Humanitarian Missions

 

“St. Peter Preaching in the Presence of St. Mark” (ca. 1433 AD) by Fra Angelico, from Linaioli Tabernacle (Detail)
“St. Peter Preaching in the Presence of St. Mark” (ca. 1433 AD) by Fra Angelico, from Linaioli Tabernacle (Detail)

The famous historical wealth and assets of the Templar Order before the French persecution of 1307 AD were seized and redistributed to other Orders of Chivalry by the Vatican Papal Bull Vox in Excelso of 1312 AD [57]. Any remaining assets surviving through dynastic Templar families were systematically seized by modern governments through inheritance taxes. The modern Templar Order was thus restored in the same financial position as the original founding Knights Templar in 1118 AD.

The medieval Templars were popularly known as the “Poor Knights of the Temple of Solomon” [58] because of their prolonged poverty during the formative decades of the Order, and later because the Templars did not retain personal wealth, but rather accumulated assets as endowment funds for the Order as an institution of worldwide impact upholding the pillars of civilization.

It is thus entirely authentic and traditional for the modern Order to also be “Poor Knights” engaged in non-profit fundraising, after its already costly Templar Restoration and first public reemergence in over 700 years.

The Temple Rule encourages Templars to “receive things for charity” (Rule 13), allows working equipment to “be given to [them] in charity” (Rule 52), permits donations to be disbursed “in charity” for costs of work on missions (Rule 58), and commands Templars to actively facilitate “all offerings and all forms of alms” to the Order as much as possible (Rule 64) [59].

The Papal Bull Omne Datum Optimum of 1139 AD confirmed that the Templar Order should keep all “spoils” (acquired funds) as the fruits of its efforts, to “convert for [its] own uses”, and could receive “possessions and goods… by grant of Bishops, by generosity of Kings or Princes, by gift of the Faithful or by other just [lawful] means” [60].  The Papal Bull Milites Templi of 1144 AD also instructed all Clergy to “encourage the people… to make contributions in order to supply [the] needs” of the Templar Order [61].

Therefore, this original historical mission of Non-Profit Fundraising remains a necessary priority for the modern Order, to support all other Templar humanitarian missions. All Templars are thus required to continually and actively promote and facilitate non-profit fundraising.

In many cases, the Order does not raise funds for itself, but rather arranges donations and grants to independent third-party non-profit institutions, for humanitarian projects which it supports.

 

 

Suggested Related Topics

Learn about the Real Enemies of the Order which Templars oppose.

Learn about the Defenders of the Church role of the Order.

Learn about Sacred Activism as Templar Faith in Action.

 

Academic Source References

 

[1] Hugh Chisholm, “Fitzwalter, Robert” in Encyclopedia Britannica (1911), 11th Edition, Cambridge University Press, p.449.

[2] Frank Sanello, The Knights Templars: God’s Warriors, the Devil’s Bankers, Taylor Trade Publishing, Oxford (2005), pp.5-6, 7.

[3] Piers Paul Read, The Templars (1999), Phoenix Press, London (2001), pp.91-92.

[4] Henri de Curzon, La Règle du Temple, La Société de L’Histoire de France, Paris (1886), in Librairie Renouard, Rule 121.

[5] Judith M. Upton-Ward, The Rule of the Templars, Woodbridge, The Boydell Press (1992); Dissertation for Master of Philosophy at Reading University; Including Hierarchical Rules, pp.1-2.

[6] Saint Bernard de Clairvaux, Liber ad Milites Templi de Laude Novae Militiae, Documented in: J. Leclercq (Editor), Sancti Bernardi Opera, Rome (1963), Volume 3, Section 5, pp.217-218; English translation in: C. Greenia, Cistercian Fathers Series, Michigan (1977), No.19.

[7] Judith M. Upton-Ward, The Rule of the Templars, Woodbridge, The Boydell Press (1992); Dissertation for Master of Philosophy at Reading University; Including Hierarchical Rules, p.6.

[8] Emile Leon Gautier, La Chevalerie (1883); Translated in: Henry Frith, Chivalry, George Routledge & Sons, London (1891), Chapter II, Commandment II.

[9] Frank Sanello, The Knights Templars: God’s Warriors, the Devil’s Bankers, Taylor Trade Publishing, Oxford (2005), p.38.

[10] The Vatican, The Catholic Encyclopedia (1912), The Encyclopedia Press, New York (1913), Volume 14, “Templars, Knights”, Part 2, “Their Marvellous Growth”, pp.493-494.

[11] The Vatican, The Catholic Encyclopedia (1911), The Encyclopedia Press, New York (1913), Volume 8, “Jerusalem”, p.363.

[12] Frank Sanello, The Knights Templars: God’s Warriors, the Devil’s Bankers, Taylor Trade Publishing, Oxford (2003), p.79.

[13] Rebecca Wallace, International Law: A Student Introduction, 2nd Edition, Sweet & Maxwell (1986).

[14] Vienna Convention on the Law of Treaties (1969), Article 3.

[15] Vienna Convention on Diplomatic Relations (1961), Preamble; Vienna Convention on Consular Relations (1963), Preamble; New York Convention on Jurisdictional Immunities of States (2004), Preamble: ¶5:  All recognizing the “status of diplomatic agents” from all forms of nation states “since ancient times”, including historical sovereign entities of “differing constitutional and social systems”.

[16] Vienna Convention on the Law of Treaties (1969), Articles 3, 38:  Status as a sovereign “subject of international law” is binding upon all countries regardless of recognition; Vienna Convention on Consular Relations (1963), Article 47.1; New York Charter of Economic Rights of States (1974), Preamble: ¶3, ¶7, Article 4: Countries “shall not discriminate” against a historical form of nation state.

[17] Anonymous, Quote: “Definition of a Diplomat…”, First known reference: Saint Louis Star-Times, Missouri (27 November 1937), p.10, Column 1; Later popularized by: Caskie Stinnett, Out of the Red, Random House, New York (1960), p.43; Confirmed by: Bergen Evans (Editor), Dictionary of Quotations, Delacorte Press, New York (1968), “Diplomacy”, p.171.

[18] Oxford English Dictionary, Oxford University Press (2018), “Diplomacy”.

[19] Merriam Webster Dictionary, Springfield Massachusetts (2018), “Geopolitics”.

[20] Henri de Curzon, La Règle du Temple, La Société de L’Histoire de France, Paris (1886), in Librairie Renouard, Rule 41.

[21] Old Testament, Authorized King James Version (AKJV), Cambridge University Press (1990), Psalm 115:1.

[22] New Testament, Authorized King James Version (AKJV), Cambridge University Press (1990), Matthew 6:1-4.

[23] Henri de Curzon, La Règle du Temple, La Société de L’Histoire de France, Paris (1886), in Librairie Renouard, Rules 1, 9.

[24] Henri de Curzon, La Règle du Temple, La Société de L’Histoire de France, Paris (1886), in Librairie Renouard, Rule 37.

[25] Henri de Curzon, La Règle du Temple, La Société de L’Histoire de France, Paris (1886), in Librairie Renouard, Rules 2, 47, 57, 59.

[26] Paul Brand, Henry II and the Creation of the English Common Law, in Christopher Harper-Bill & Nicholas Vincent, Henry II: New Interpretations, Woodbridge UK, Boydell Press (2007), p.216.

[27] Hugh Chisholm, “Fitzwalter, Robert” in Encyclopedia Britannica (1911), 11th Edition, Cambridge University Press, p.449.

[28] Lord Judge Master of the Temple, The Greatest Knight, in The Inner Temple Yearbook: 2013-2014, Honourable Society of the Inner Temple, pp.14-15.

[29] T.F. Tout, “Fitzwalter, Robert” in Leslie Stephen, Dictionary of National Biography (1889), London, Smith Elder & Co., p.226.

[30] Gabriel Ronay, The Tartar Khan’s Englishman, London, Cassel (1978), pp.38-40.

[31] T.F. Tout, “Fitzwalter, Robert” in Leslie Stephen, Dictionary of National Biography (1889), London, Smith Elder & Co., p.226.

[32] Danny Danziger & John Gillingham, 1215: The Year of Magna Carta, Hodder & Stoughton (2003), p.271.

[33] Lord Judge Master of the Temple, The Greatest Knight, in The Inner Temple Yearbook: 2013-2014, Honourable Society of the Inner Temple, pp.12-15.

[34] John Baker, Inner Temple History, Inner Temple (2009), Introduction, Part 1.

[35] James Campbell, The Map of Early Modern London: Chancery Lane, University of Victoria (2009).

[36] Watt, Dunbar & Benham, The Story of the Inns of Court, Boston, Houghton Mifflin (1928), p.133.

[37] Henri de Curzon, La Règle du Temple, La Société de L’Histoire de France, Paris (1886), in Librairie Renouard, Rules 2, 19, 29, 47, 59.

[38] New Testament, Authorized King James Version (AKJV), Cambridge University Press (1990), Matthew 25:34-45.

[39] Henri de Curzon, La Règle du Temple, La Société de L’Histoire de France, Paris (1886), in Librairie Renouard, Rules 1, 2, 9, 37.

[40] Henri de Curzon, La Règle du Temple, La Société de L’Histoire de France, Paris (1886), in Librairie Renouard, Rules 54, 315, 379, 55, 151.

[41] Oxford University, The Oxford Encyclopedia of Ancient Egypt, The American University in Cairo Press, Cairo (2001), “Animal Cults”, p.345.

[42] Old Testament, Authorized King James Version (AKJV), Cambridge University Press (1990), Ecclesiastes 3:11, 3:19-20.

[43] The Holy Bible, Authorized King James Version (AKJV), Cambridge University Press (1990), Psalm 36:6, Luke 3:6.

[44] Old Testament, Authorized King James Version (AKJV), Cambridge University Press (1990), Numbers 22:23-33.

[45] Henri de Curzon, La Règle du Temple, La Société de L’Histoire de France, Paris (1886), in Librairie Renouard, Rules 1, 6, 9, 279.

[46] Pope Innocent II, Omne Datum Optimum “Every Good Gift” (29 March 1139); Malcolm Barber & Keith Bate, The Templars: Selected Sources, Manchester University Press (2002), pp.59-64.

[47] Saint Bernard de Clairvaux, Liber ad Milites Templi: De Laude Novae Militae, “Speech on Knights of the Temple: In Praise of the New Knighthood” (ca. 1136 AD); Translated in: Conrad Greenia, Bernard of Clairvaux: Treatises Three, Cistercian Fathers Series, No. 13, Cistercian Publications (1977), pp.127-145, “Prologue”.

[48] Henri de Curzon, La Règle du Temple, La Société de L’Histoire de France, Paris (1886), in Librairie Renouard, Rules 2, 8.

[49] Saint Bernard de Clairvaux, Liber ad Milites Templi: De Laude Novae Militae, “Speech on Knights of the Temple: In Praise of the New Knighthood” (ca. 1136 AD);  Translated in:  Conrad Greenia, Bernard of Clairvaux: Treatises Three, Cistercian Fathers Series, No. 13, Cistercian Publications (1977), pp.127-145, “Chapter 3”.

[50] Geoffrey de Vinsauf, Itinerary of Richard I and Others to the Holy Land (ca. 1191 AD); Published in: Lord John de Joinville (Editor), Chronicles of the Crusades: Contemporary Narratives of the Crusade of Richard Coeur de Lion, Henry G. Bohn, London (1848), Part 2, “Prologue”, p.67.

[51] Alan Butler & Stephen Dafoe, The Warriors and Bankers, Lewis Masonic, Surrey, England (2006), p.20.

[52] French author (unidentified), De la Maçonnerie Parmi Les Chretiens (“On Masonry Among Christians”), Germany (ca. 1750 AD), quoting the 12th century Italian Abbot Joachim of Flora (Calabria), a friend of Richard the Lionheart, in: Frank Sanello, The Knights Templars: God’s Warriors, the Devil’s Bankers, Taylor Trade Publishing, Oxford (2003), p.223.

[53] Michael Lamy, Les Templiers: Ces Grand Seigneurs aux Blancs Manteaux, Auberon (1994), Bordeaux (1997), p.28.

[54] Keith Laidler, The Head of God: The Lost Treasure of the Templars, 1st Edition, Weidenfeld & Nicolson, London (1998), p.177.

[55] Piers Paul Read, The Templars: The Dramatic History of the Knights Templar, the Most Powerful Military Order of the Crusades, 1st Edition, Weidenfeld & Nicolson, London (1999), Phoenix Press, London (2001), Orion Publishing Group, London (2012), p.305.

[56] Malcolm Barber & Keith Bate, The Templars: Selected Sources, Manchester University Press (2002), p.2.

[57] Pope Clement V, Vox in Excelso (22 March 1312), Regestum 7952, in Norman P. Tanner (Ed.), Decrees of the Ecumenical Councils, Georgetown University Press (1990); Karl Joseph Von Hefele, A History of the Councils of the Church: From the Original Documents (1896), Classic Reprint, Forgotten Books (2012).

[58] Charles G. Addison, The History of the Knights Templar (1842), pp.4-5, citing a Vatican document by the 13th century Pope Urban IV (Jacques Pantaleon, 1195-1264), the Latin Patriarch of Jerusalem, as “Pantaleon, lib. iii. p. 82.”

[59] Henri de Curzon, La Règle du Temple, La Société de L’Histoire de France, Paris (1886), in Librairie Renouard, Rules 13, 52, 58, 64.

[60] Pope Innocent II, Omne Datum Optimum, “Every Good Gift” (29 March 1139), translated in: Malcolm Barber & Keith Bate, The Templars: Selected Sources, Manchester University Press (2002), pp.8, 59-64.

[61] Pope Celestine II, Milites Templi, “Knights of the Temple” (5 January 1144), translated in: Malcolm Barber & Keith Bate, The Templars: Selected Sources, Manchester University Press (2002), pp.8, 64-65.